NUCare/PHI Seminar Series Talk by Diana M. Higgins, PhD

NUCare and Personal Health Informatics present a talk by Diana M. Higgins, PhD

Harnessing technology to deliver pain self-management interventions

Monday, January 23rd, 12:00 – 1:00 PM | 177 Huntington Avenue, 12th floor

Followed by a discussion with the speaker and light refreshments. Please inform the security desk that you are attending the NUCare/PHI seminar.

Abstract

The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) report, Relieving Pain in America, indicates that chronic pain affects approximately 300 million Americans. More recently, opioids, which have been used in the past to treat chronic pain, are criticized for contributing to an epidemic of substance use disorders, accidental overdose, and death. The IOM and CDC have suggested avoiding opioid use for chronic pain due to limited efficacy and focusing on non-pharmacologic options such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) as first line treatments. CBT for chronic pain focuses on reducing pain intensity, improving functioning, and improving quality of life; however, several barriers to accessing this treatment have been identified, including limited number of trained providers, length of treatment/number of visits, travel, caregiver responsibilities, and work schedules. Using technology to deliver CBT for chronic pain may help address these barriers. Approaches such as interactive voice response (IVR), internet-based, smartphone applications, and artificial intelligence (AI) have been applied to assessing and treating chronic pain. Ongoing trials using IVR, internet, apps, and AI in veteran samples will be discussed, in addition to a discussion of challenges for research and clinical implementation in VA settings.

Speaker

Dr. Diana M. Higgins is Assistant Professor, in the Department of Psychiatry, at Boston University School of Medicine. She is also the director of Pain Psychology, Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Medicine Service/Research Service, at the VA Boston Healthcare System.

Dr. Higgins received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Maine, completed her predoctoral internship in clinical health psychology at VA Connecticut Healthcare System, and completed a fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Prior to joining the faculty at VABHS, she worked as a clinical research psychologist at VA Connecticut and held a faculty appointment at Yale School of Medicine (now adjunct), where she continues to collaborate on several research grants. Dr. Higgins has research interests in developing cognitive behavioral treatments for chronic pain and using technology to improve access to pain. Her current research involves clinical trials for pain conditions using technology (e.g., IVR, smartphone applications, Internet) to increase access to evidence-based interventions for chronic pain. One of her most recent grants examines the efficacy of an Internet-based behavioral pain management intervention for chronic low back pain.

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The NUCare Center and the Personal Health Informatics PhD program host regular interdisciplinary seminars throughout. Our speakers showcase how technology can support and enhance research in aging, self-management, health disparities, and community-based participatory research. All are welcome to join!

Visit our websites: NUCare | Personal Health Informatics

NUCare/PHI Seminar Series Talks by Andrea Grimes Parker, PhD

NUCare and Personal Health Informatics present a talk by Dr. Andea Grimes Parker

Community Wellness Informatics: Creating Technology for Health Equity

Monday, December 5th, 12:00 – 1:00 PM  |  177 Huntington Avenue, 12th floor

Followed by a discussion with the speaker and light refreshments. Please inform the security desk that you are attending the seminar.

andrea

Speaker

Andrea Grimes Parker, PhD, is an assistant professor at the College of Computer and Information Science and Bouvé College of Health Science at Northeastern University. Professor Parker’s interdisciplinary research in human-computer interaction (HCI), computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW), and personal health informatics examines how social and ubiquitous computing systems can help reduce racial, ethnic, and economic health disparities.

Abstract

In the United States (U.S.), there are serious and persistent disparities in health outcomes. Socioeconomic status is predictive of mortality and disease, with low-SES households disproportionately experiencing the poorest health outcomes. This inequality is due in large part to social determinants of health—social, physical, and economic conditions that make it more challenging to achieve wellness in low-SES communities. Disruptive innovations are sorely needed to reduce health disparities. Technology, with its growing ubiquity and ability to provide engaging, informative, and empowering experiences for people, presents exciting opportunities for health equity research. However, there has been little Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research examining how software tools should be designed to facilitate health equity in the U.S. by addressing the social determinants of health.

In this talk, I will present a set of case studies demonstrating how the Wellness Technology Lab is pursuing technology-driven social change through health promotion. These case studies explore how social computing and mobile technology can help low-SES communities both cope with barriers to wellness and address these barriers directly. Drawing upon our research on digital games for physical activity promotion in families, social computing tools for youth advocacy and wellness promotion, and a systematic review of over 80 mobile health (mHealth) publications, I will articulate opportunities and challenges for a community wellness informatics agenda within HCI.

This is the last seminar of 2016—don’t miss it!

Never miss a seminar announcement! Join our listserv.

The NUCare Center and the Personal Health Informatics PhD program host regular interdisciplinary seminars throughout. Our speakers showcase how technology can support and enhance research in aging, self-management, health disparities, and community-based participatory research. All are welcome to join!

Visit our websites: NUCare  |  Personal Health Informatics

NUCare/PHI Seminar Series Talks by Nancy Hanrahan, PhD

NUCare and Personal Health Informatics present a talk by Nancy Hanrahan, PhD

Technology innovation enhanced by nurse expertise

Monday, November 28th, 12:00 – 1:00 PM

177 Huntington Avenue, 12th floor

Followed by a discussion with the speaker and light refreshments. Please inform the security desk that you are attending the seminar.

nancy_hanrahanSpeaker

Nancy Hanrahan, PhD, RN, and FAAN, is a professor and the dean of the School of Nursing and the associate dean of the Bouvé College of Health Science, at Northeastern University.

Abstract

Because of the close juxtaposition of nurses with patients and families, they bring a valuable perspective to the development of technologies for health interventions.  Yet, few technological interventions have nurses participating on design teams.  This talk speaks to the challenges of engaging nurses in innovation, provides examples of nurse-centric technology applications, and describes the newly launched Nurse Innovation & Entrepreneurship program at the Northeastern University School of Nursing.

Upcoming seminars

12/5      Wellness Technology [Title TBD] – Presented by Andrea Grimes Parker, PhD , Assistant Professor, CCIS & Bouve College of Health Science

12/12    [Title TDB] – Matthew Goodwin, PhD, Northeastern University, CCIS & BCHS

See the whole schedule.

Never miss a seminar announcement! Join our listserv.

The NUCare Center and the Personal Health Informatics PhD program host regular interdisciplinary seminars throughout. Our speakers showcase how technology can support and enhance research in aging, self-management, health disparities, and community-based participatory research. All are welcome to join!

Visit our websites: NUCare  |  Personal Health Informatics